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80% of African countries to miss Sept. COVID -19 vaccination goal – WHO

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African countries are likely to miss the World Health Organization‘s September deadline for vaccinating the most vulnerable 10 percent of their populations against the Coronavirus COVID-19.

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In a statement released on Thursday, the WHO Regional Office for Africa said that 42 of Africa’s 54 nations (nearly 80 percent) are on track to miss the target if vaccine deliveries and vaccinations continue at the current pace.

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One-ninth of the continent’s countries, including South Africa and Morocco, has met or exceeded the World Health Assembly’s global target set in May.

When vaccinations are accelerated, two more African countries may be able to meet the target.

With less than one month to go, Matshidiso Moeti is WHO’s Regional Director for Africa.

As a result of Africa’s vaccine hoarding, the continent urgently needs more vaccines.

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African countries, however, must develop precise plans to quickly vaccinate the millions of people who are still at risk from COVID-19 as more doses arrive.

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COVID-19 vaccine vials

In August, nearly 21 million COVID-19 vaccines arrived in Africa via the COVAX Facility, an amount equal to the total of the previous four months.

After COVAX and the African Union deliver their next batch of vaccines in September, Moeti believes that Africa will have enough doses to meet the 10% target.

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COVID-19 vaccinations have increased in many African countries, but 26 countries have only used half of their COVID-19 vaccines.

Although more than 143 million doses have been administered to Africans in total, less than 3% of the continent’s population – 39 million people – are fully protected.

Comparatively, in the United States, 52% of people are fully vaccinated, while in the European Union, 57% are.

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We are disturbed by the inequity of the system.” Only 2% of the more than five billion doses given worldwide have been administered in Africa, according to the World Health Organization.

A fairer and more just global distribution of vaccines is possible, Moeti said.

According to the World Health Organization, COVID-19 cases in Africa are declining slightly, but they remain high.

Nearly 215,000 cases were reported in Central, East, and West Africa in the week ending Aug. 29, and 25 countries are reporting high or rapidly increasing case numbers, with over 5,500 deaths reported.

“Although Africa’s third wave peaked in July, the decline in new cases is glacial – far slower than in previous waves.

A pandemic still rages in Africa, according to Moeti, and we must remain vigilant.

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31 African countries have been found to have the highly transmissible Delta variant.

Forty-four countries have been found to have a beta variant and 39 have a beta variant.

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Covid -19 variants in South Africa

In South Africa, 114 cases of the C.1.2 variant have been identified.

Four other African countries have reported a single case, and only a small number of cases have been reported internationally.

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After being reported to WHO in July, this new variant has a very low prevalence.

Covid-19 variants C.1.2 and other have been reported, and we are keeping a close eye on their spread and evolution.

Using a mask, avoiding physical contact, and regularly cleaning your hands will help you stay protected against any type of infection, according to Moeti.

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